katy crowe

Facts on the Ground: Katy Crowe and Coleen Sterritt

Two Coats of Paint | June 5, 2020 

Contributed by Sharon Butler / In the exhibition statement for “Evenso: The Common and Curious,” a two-person exhibition at the Los Angeles Harbor College Fine Arts Gallery featuring Katy Crowe‘s paintings and Coleen Sterritt‘s objects, curator Ron Linden quoted a piece Ben Lerner wrote about Michael Palmer’s poetry for Harper’s Magazine. Back in 2018, when state of world was disturbing but had not become downright dystopic, Lerner considered what it meant for Palmer to make art in troubled times. “Pushing to work against his unmatched fluency, trying to hit an off note given his perfect pitch. For it can be wrong to get song right if, like Palmer, you are suspicious of any glib resolution or false consolation, if you are committed to exploring the contradictions of art making in dark times, if your paradoxical task is to represent what escapes representation.”

Constance Mallinson in Conversation with
Katy Crowe and Coleen Sterritt

Art & Object, Press Release | April 28, 2020 

Katy Crowe and Coleen Sterritt at Harbor College Art Gallery

Constance Mallinson talks with artists Katy Crowe, Coleen Sterritt and Ron Linden Gallery Director about their continuing exhibition at Harbor College

Constance Mallinson: The work in the exhibition seems to represent a “mature phase” of both of your practices. Can you describe what led up to this particular work with a bit of history of your formal and thematic concerns?

Katy Crowe: Abstract painting has been my path for more than 40 years and so this body of paintings is just the continuation of my painting process involving the accumulation, and expansion of my abstract vocabulary. My concerns have always been to make paintings that engage me visually and intellectually through color and form, metaphor and allusion to various architectonic and natural forms and systems. The painting is revealed through the process, although I will reuse and recycle old ideas into new paintings along with newer visual tropes. Color is intuitive and the element that completes the “chord”. Narrative has not played a role in my work.


Evenso: The Common & The Curious

Art & Cake | May 28, 2020 

Los Angeles Harbor College Fine Arts Gallery is pleased to present Evenso, current works by Katy Crowe and Coleen Sterritt. The exhibition will open with an Artists’ Reception Saturday, March 14, from 4 – 7PM.

Introducing painter Katy Crowe and sculptor Coleen Sterritt, these words came to mind: In an excerpt from Ben Lerner’s intro to poet Michael Palmer on making art in dark times:
“…something like Wallace Stevens’ “Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction” (“It must be abstract.” “It must change.”) – pushing himself to work against his unmatched fluency, trying to hit an off note given his perfect pitch. For it can be wrong to get song right if, like Palmer, you are suspicious of any glib resolution or false consolation, if you are committed to exploring the contradictions of art making in dark times, if your paradoxical task is to represent what escapes representation.”


Abstract West Coast Women Painters
Her California Continuum at 60 Wall Gallery

Deutsche Bank, New York

Seven years after her death, Helen Lundeberg was paid an extraordinary homage. The legendary band Sonic Youth dedicated a song to her on their 2006 album Rather Ripped in which they listed all the titles of the paintings in the exhibition Helen Lundeberg and the Illusory Landscape, which was shown posthumously at the Louis Stern Fine Arts gallery in Los Angeles. This was not by chance. Sonic Youth, whose album covers are adorned with works by Gerhard Richter and the West Coast artists Mike Kelley and Raymond Pettibon, is also an established name in the U.S. art scene. With their song, they immortalize a pioneer of 1960s Hard-edge painting. Lundeberg, whose works were also represented in the major survey show Pacific Standard Time, had a strong impact on West Coast painting.


artUS, Issue #31, 2011
rebidishu two | 2010

Esther Ribot

Katy Crowe/Recent Paintings Los Angeles Harbor College Fine Arts Gallery | Wilmington, CA Katy Crowe’s “Rebidishu Two” (though November 13, 2010) was exhibited at Los Angeles Harbor College Gallery, whose modest presence in the college’s fine arts building belies the significance of artist Ron Linden’s curatorial program, which over the last ten years has featured such established artists as Ted Twine, Coy Howard, Merwin Belin and Dave Smith. In the case of Crowe, her long professional career is marked by a strong emphasis on process, resulting in intricate, studied abstractions. Each drawing or painting responds to prior work, just as each brushstroke is the logical answer to the one before.


artUS, Issue #17, 2007

Laurence A. Rickels

Katy Crowe is the inaugural exhibition of Jancar Gallery, located just a few blocks north of its earlier incarnation. In Ali Acerol:Three Story Man in a One Story Town, a collection of Acerol’s autobiographical and poetic words transcribed, compiled, and edited by Richard Hertz (Minneola Press, 2006), we find the former venue (Jancar-Kulenschmidt) extolled as ”the hottest gallery” that “did beautiful shows” (9). Acerol’s reminiscence of a Christopher Williams show sets the standard: “it consisted of three photos of J.F. Kennedy, showing him from the back. He had ordered the images from the library of Congress. When I saw them, I thought it was an incredible series. The message was: if the camera were a gun, anybody could shoot Kennedy. But those images were taken way before Kennedy was shot” (9).